How to make Bordeaux Mixture with Copper Sulphate and Hydrated Lime

Copper sulphate Pentahydrate

calcium hydroxide

Copper(II) sulfate (CuSO4), is a common salt of copper. Copper sulfate exists as a series of compounds that differ in their degree of hydration. The anhydrous form is a pale green or gray-white powder, while the hydrated form is bright blue. The archaic name for copper(II) sulfate is “blue vitriol” or “bluestone”. The most common form of copper sulphate is in the pentahydrate form and there are over 100 manufacturers producing around 200,000 tonnes per annum. Approximately three-quarters of copper sulphate pentahydrate is used in agriculture, principally as a fungicide, but also for treating copper-deficient soils. Two commonly used fungicide solutions containing copper sulphate are the Bordeaux Mixture and the Burgundy Mixture.

What is a Bordeaux Mixture ?

The Bordeaux mixture (also known as the Bordo Mix) was developed in the 19th century in France to control a downy mildew that caused problems on vines in the Bordeaux region of France. It contains a blend of copper sulphate and hydrated lime in water and is used to control different diseases on a wide range of plants and crops. It is used mainly to control garden, vineyard, nursery and farm infestations of fungi. It is the copper ions in the bordeaux mixture which kills the fungal spores by preventing the spores germinating. As such, the product is only effective as a prevention and not as a treatment for the fungus after it has formed.

Among Bordeaux’s many uses are applications in autumn and winter to manage:

  • Fire blight on pears and apples;
  • Leaf curl and shot hole on peaches and nectarines;
  • Downy mildew and powdery mildew on grapes;
  • Peacock spot on olives;
  • Walnut blight on walnut; and
  • Black spot on roses.

How to prepare the Bordeaux Mixture:

Ideally solutions should be prepared fresh. The conventional method of describing the mixture’s composition is to give the weight of CuSO4, the weight of hydrated lime and the volume of water, in that order. The percentage of the weight of CuSO4 to the weight of water employed determines the concentration of the mixture. Thus a 1% Bordeaux mixture, which is typical, would have the formula 1:1:100, with the first “1” representing 1 kg CuSO4 (pentahydrate), the second representing 1 kg hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide), and the 100 representing 100 litres (100 kg) water. As CuSO4 contains 25% copper, the copper content of a 1% Bordeaux mixture would be 0.25%.

For small-scale preparation: add 3 1/3 tablespoons of copper sulfate and 10 tablespoons of  hydrated lime in 5 Litres of water.

To make – dissolve the copper sulphate in half the water and dissolve the hydrated lime in the other half of the water. When both are fully dissolved, mix the two solutions together and stir well.

Please Note: it is important that metal containers in particular, iron, are not used to make up the Bordeaux solution. Use wooden or plastic containers.

Bordeaux mixture has been found to be harmful to fish, livestock and—due to potential build up of copper in the soil—earthworms.

Because Bordeaux can leave a blue-green discoloration on plants or painted surfaces, use it on dormant, deciduous plants that are away from buildings and fences.

How to use Bordeaux Mixture.

Spraying with Bordeaux mixture should be carried out before the season of spores starts. Typical usage solutions are 0.5% to 1.0% Bordeaux mix. Do not use solutions stronger than 1% as this may harm plants. Apply at 2 to 3 week intervals to give complete protection.

When applying Bordeaux, be sure to wear protective clothing, including goggles, because the spray deposit is corrosive, can permanently stain clothing, and is difficult to wash off.

Where to buy copper sulphate online UK

Where to buy hydrated lime / calcium hydroxide online UK

How to make Bordeaux Mixture with Copper Sulfate and Calcium Hydroxide

Copper sulphate Pentahydrate

calcium hydroxide

Copper(II) sulfate (CuSO4), is a common salt of copper. Copper sulfate exists as a series of compounds that differ in their degree of hydration. The anhydrous form is a pale green or gray-white powder, while the hydrated form is bright blue. The archaic name for copper(II) sulfate is “blue vitriol” or “bluestone”. The most common form of copper sulphate is in the pentahydrate form and there are over 100 manufacturers producing around 200,000 tonnes per annum. Approximately three-quarters of copper sulphate pentahydrate is used in agriculture, principally as a fungicide, but also for treating copper-deficient soils. Two commonly used fungicide solutions containing copper sulphate are the Bordeaux Mixture and the Burgundy Mixture.

What is a Bordeaux Mixture ?

The Bordeaux mixture (also known as the Bordo Mix) was developed in the 19th century in France to control a downy mildew that caused problems on vines in the Bordeaux region of France. It contains a blend of copper sulphate and hydrated lime in water and is used to control different diseases on a wide range of plants and crops. It is used mainly to control garden, vineyard, nursery and farm infestations of fungi. It is the copper ions in the bordeaux mixture which kills the fungal spores by preventing the spores germinating. As such, the product is only effective as a prevention and not as a treatment for the fungus after it has formed.

Among Bordeaux’s many uses are applications in autumn and winter to manage:

  • Fire blight on pears and apples;
  • Leaf curl and shot hole on peaches and nectarines;
  • Downy mildew and powdery mildew on grapes;
  • Peacock spot on olives;
  • Walnut blight on walnut; and
  • Black spot on roses.

How to prepare the Bordeaux Mixture:

Ideally solutions should be prepared fresh. The conventional method of describing the mixture’s composition is to give the weight of CuSO4, the weight of hydrated lime and the volume of water, in that order. The percentage of the weight of CuSO4 to the weight of water employed determines the concentration of the mixture. Thus a 1% Bordeaux mixture, which is typical, would have the formula 1:1:100, with the first “1” representing 1 kg CuSO4 (pentahydrate), the second representing 1 kg hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide), and the 100 representing 100 litres (100 kg) water. As CuSO4 contains 25% copper, the copper content of a 1% Bordeaux mixture would be 0.25%.

For small-scale preparation: add 3 1/3 tablespoons of copper sulfate and 10 tablespoons of  hydrated lime in 5 Litres of water.

To make – dissolve the copper sulphate in half the water and dissolve the hydrated lime in the other half of the water. When both are fully dissolved, mix the two solutions together and stir well.

Please Note: it is important that metal containers in particular, iron, are not used to make up the Bordeaux solution. Use wooden or plastic containers.

Bordeaux mixture has been found to be harmful to fish, livestock and—due to potential build up of copper in the soil—earthworms.

Because Bordeaux can leave a blue-green discoloration on plants or painted surfaces, use it on dormant, deciduous plants that are away from buildings and fences.

How to use Bordeaux Mixture.

Spraying with Bordeaux mixture should be carried out before the season of spores starts. Typical usage solutions are 0.5% to 1.0% Bordeaux mix. Do not use solutions stronger than 1% as this may harm plants. Apply at 2 to 3 week intervals to give complete protection.

When applying Bordeaux, be sure to wear protective clothing, including goggles, because the spray deposit is corrosive, can permanently stain clothing, and is difficult to wash off.

Where to buy copper sulphate online UK

Where to buy hydrated lime / calcium hydroxide online UK

What is Sulfamic Acid and what is it used for ?

WHAT IS SULFAMIC ACID

Sulfamic acid is a white crystalline solid which is stable and non-hygroscopic. It is soluble in water and formamide and slightly soluble in methanol, ether, acetone and concentrated sulphuric acid. It is classified as a strong inorganic acid and is commercially produced from urea and fuming sulphuric acid. At room temperature, dilute aqueous  acid solution is stable for a long time but rapid hydrolysis occurs at elevated temperatures. It’s solution is less corrosive toward metals than other mineral acids like hydrochloric acid.

Sulfamic acid is used as an acidic cleaning agent, typically for metals and ceramics. It is a replacement for hydrochloric acid for the removal of rust. In households, it is often found as a descaling agent in detergents, cleaners and toilet cleaners for the removal of limescale.

Properties of Sulfamic acid

  • Synonyms: suphamic acid; Amidosulfonic acid; Amidosulphonic acid; sulphamidic acid;
  • CAS No: 5329–14–6
  • EINECS No: 226–218–8
  • Appearance: white crystalline solid
  • Minimum quality: 99.8%
  • Molecular formula: NH2SO3H
  • Molar mass: 97.09 g/mol
  • Density: 2.15g/cm3
  • Solubility in water: 213 g/L (20C)
  • Melting point: 190 – 225 C
  • Boiling point: decomposes
  • pH: 1.2 (1% solution @ 20C)
  • Refractive index: 1.553

Where to Buy Sulphamic Acid / Sulfamic Acid online UK

USES OF SULfAMIC ACID:

  • Descaler, Cleaner & Rust Remover
  • removing excess grout on tiles, efflorescence and other mineral deposits
  • Cleaner & descaler for Dairy equipment (pipeline milkers, milk evaporators)
  • Cleaner & descaler for Brewery equipment (pipelines, Vats, etc)
  • Catalyst for esterfication process process
  • Used in dye and pigment manufacture
  • Used as a herbicide
  • Effecticve against Foot and Mouth (approved bty Defra)
  • Ingredient in Denture Tablets
  • Coagulator for urea-formaldehyde resins
  • Ingredient in fire extinguishing media
  • Pulp and paper industry as a chloride stabilizer
  • Synthesis of nitrous oxide by reaction with nitric acid

Sulfamic acid in descaling

Sulfamic Acid is super efficient descaling agent and is used for cleaning a variety of industrial equipment and domestic appliances. It is used for cleaning boilers, heat exchangers, condensers, jackets and coils, descaling toilets, removing excess grout on tiles, efflorescence and other mineral deposits etc (See below for details on how to use). It helps remove hard water scale, protein deposits, beer and milk stone, light rust and copper corrosion

Sulfamic acid in paper & pulp Industry

Sulfamic Acid prevents pulp degradation due to temperature at the chlorination and hydrochloride stage. It permits bleaching at higher temperature and lower PH without loss of strength.

Sulfamic acid is used in manufacturing of Dyes, Pigments and in the dyeing of leather

Sulfamic Acid removes excess of nitrides used in the diazotization reactions in the manufacturing of dye stuffs and pigments. Nitrides if present in process water of effluents can also be removed by using Sulphamic Acid

Sulfamic acid in Chlorine Stabilization

Chlorine gas in water form HOCL which reacts with Sulfamic Acid form N-Chloro-Sulphamic Acid to N-ChloroSufamic Acid more stable and yet has active chlorine, Because of this, Sulphamic Acid is used for stabilizing chlorine in swimming pools and cooling towers.

Sulfamic acid in Electroplating and Electro-refining

Metal sulphamate electrolytes values for their high solubility cadmium, cobalt nickle, lead silver and radium sulphamte deposits are bright and dense. Lead sulphamate is used in refining lead when a high quality is desired.

Sulfamic acid in Sulphation and Sulphamation

Sulfamic acid is used for sulphation and sulphamation of many organic compounds. Sulphation of aklyl pheno-ethylen oxide condensation products 9for detergents and sulphation of ethoxylated phenol-formaldehyde resins is preferable with Sulphamic Acid. Stronger agents cause unwanted ring sulphomation.

How to use Sulfamic Acid for cleaning & descaling:

For removing excess grout from tiling or dissolving efflorescence from walls, floors etc: Make up a solution of sulfamic acid by dissolving 80–100g per litre of warm water. Apply to surface using a cloth or brush and allow to work for a few minutes. Agitate with brush if necessary and rinse with clean water. Please Note: if using around coloured grout use a weaker solution of approx 2% (20g per litre of water) to reduce the risk of leaching out any colour from the grout.

For descaling equipment use a 10% solution. Sulfamic acid is safe for steel, iron, glass and wood equipment, and may be used with caution on copper, aluminium, and galvanized metal surfaces. Clean in a soak tank or by circulation. For surfaces, apply to surface using a cloth or brush and allow to work for a few minutes. Agitate with brush if necessary and rinse thoroughly with clean water.

For Boiler systems & Cooling Towers use a circulation treatment of a 10% to 15% solution depending on how bad the system is. Before applying flush out system and refill with clean water. Determine the volume of water and mix in the sulfamic acid at a rate of 100g to 150g per litre of water. Circulate the solution at room temperature or heated to a maximum of 60C for heavier cleaning. Note: Do not use at boiling point or product will undergo hydrolysis and not work. After cleaning rinse thoroughly and check system. Repeat applications may be necessary for heavily soiled systems. After cleaning Periodic flushing of the system to remove loosened scale and contaminants will be necessary.

For rust removal use a solution of 10%-20%.

Health & Safety

R-phrase(s): R36/38 Irritating to eyes and skin. R52/53 Harmful to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.

S-phrase(s): S26 In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice. S28 After contact with skin, wash immediately with plenty of soap and water. S61 Avoid release to the environment. Refer to special instructions/ Safety data sheets.

See MSDS for Sulfamic acid for full details.

.

Where to Buy Sulphamic Acid / Sulfamic Acid online UK

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What is Sulphamic Acid and what is it used for ?

WHAT IS SULPHAMIC ACID

Sulphamic acid is a white crystalline solid which is stable and non-hygroscopic. It is soluble in water and formamide and slightly soluble in methanol, ether, acetone and concentrated sulphuric acid. It is classified as a strong inorganic acid and is commercially produced from urea and fuming sulphuric acid. At room temperature, dilute aqueous sulphamic acid solution is stable for a long time but rapid hydrolysis occurs at elevated temperatures. It’s solution is less corrosive toward metals than other mineral acids like hydrochloric acid.

Sulphamic acid is used as an acidic cleaning agent, typically for metals and ceramics. It is a replacement for hydrochloric acid for the removal of rust. In households, it is often found as a descaling agent in detergents, cleaners and toilet cleaners for the removal of limescale.

Properties of Sulphamic acid

  • Synonyms: sulfamic acid; Amidosulfonic acid; Amidosulphonic acid; sulphamidic acid;
  • CAS No: 5329–14–6
  • EINECS No: 226–218–8
  • Appearance: white crystalline solid
  • Minimum quality: 99.8%
  • Molecular formula: NH2SO3H
  • Molar mass: 97.09 g/mol
  • Density: 2.15g/cm3
  • Solubility in water: 213 g/L (20C)
  • Melting point: 190 – 225 C
  • Boiling point: decomposes
  • pH: 1.2 (1% solution @ 20C)
  • Refractive index: 1.553

Where to Buy Sulphamic Acid / Sulfamic Acid online UK

USES OF SULPHAMIC ACID:

  • Descaler, Cleaner & Rust Remover
  • removing excess grout on tiles, efflorescence and other mineral deposits
  • Cleaner & descaler for Dairy equipment (pipeline milkers, milk evaporators)
  • Cleaner & descaler for Brewery equipment (pipelines, Vats, etc)
  • Catalyst for esterfication process process
  • Used in dye and pigment manufacture
  • Used as a herbicide
  • Effecticve against Foot and Mouth (approved bty Defra)
  • Ingredient in Denture Tablets
  • Coagulator for urea-formaldehyde resins
  • Ingredient in fire extinguishing media
  • Pulp and paper industry as a chloride stabilizer
  • Synthesis of nitrous oxide by reaction with nitric acid

Sulphamic acid in descaling

Sulphamic Acid is super efficient descaling agent and is used for cleaning a variety of industrial equipment and domestic appliances. It is used for cleaning boilers, heat exchangers, condensers, jackets and coils, descaling toilets, removing excess grout on tiles, efflorescence and other mineral deposits etc (See below for details on how to use). It helps remove hard water scale, protein deposits, beer and milk stone, light rust and copper corrosion

Sulphamic acid in paper & pulp Industry

Sulphamic Acid prevents pulp degradation due to temperature at the chlorination and hydrochloride stage. It permits bleaching at higher temperature and lower PH without loss of strength.

Sulphamic acid is used in manufacturing of Dyes, Pigments and in the dyeing of leather

Sulphamic Acid removes excess of nitrides used in the diazotization reactions in the manufacturing of dye stuffs and pigments. Nitrides if present in process water of effluents can also be removed by using Sulphamic Acid

Sulphamic acid in Chlorine Stabilization

Chlorine gas in water form HOCL which reacts with Sulphamic Acid form N-Chloro-Sulphamic Acid to N-ChloroSufamic Acid more stable and yet has active chlorine, Because of this, Sulphamic Acid is used for stabilizing chlorine in swimming pools and cooling towers.

Sulphamic acid in Electroplating and Electro-refining

Metal sulphamate electrolytes values for their high solubility cadmium, cobalt nickle, lead silver and radium sulphamte deposits are bright and dense. Lead sulphamate is used in refining lead when a high quality is desired.

Sulphamic acid in Sulphation and Sulphamation

Sulphamic acid is used for sulphation and sulphamation of many organic compounds. Sulphation of aklyl pheno-ethylen oxide condensation products 9for detergents and sulphation of ethoxylated phenol-formaldehyde resins is preferable with Sulphamic Acid. Stronger agents cause unwanted ring sulphomation.

How to use Sulphamic Acid for cleaning & descaling:

For removing excess grout from tiling or dissolving efflorescence from walls, floors etc: Make up a solution of sulphamic acid by dissolving 80–100g per litre of warm water. Apply to surface using a cloth or brush and allow to work for a few minutes. Agitate with brush if necessary and rinse with clean water. Please Note: if using around coloured grout use a weaker solution of approx 2% (20g per litre of water) to reduce the risk of leaching out any colour from the grout.

For descaling equipment use a 10% solution. Sulphamic acid is safe for steel, iron, glass and wood equipment, and may be used with caution on copper, aluminium, and galvanized metal surfaces. Clean in a soak tank or by circulation. For surfaces, apply to surface using a cloth or brush and allow to work for a few minutes. Agitate with brush if necessary and rinse thoroughly with clean water.

For Boiler systems & Cooling Towers use a circulation treatment of a 10% to 15% solution depending on how bad the system is. Before applying flush out system and refill with clean water. Determine the volume of water and mix in the sulphamic acid at a rate of 100g to 150g per litre of water. Circulate the solution at room temperature or heated to a maximum of 60C for heavier cleaning. Note: Do not use at boiling point or product will undergo hydrolysis and not work. After cleaning rinse thoroughly and check system. Repeat applications may be necessary for heavily soiled systems. After cleaning Periodic flushing of the system to remove loosened scale and contaminants will be necessary.

For rust removal use a solution of 10%-20%.

Health & Safety

R-phrase(s): R36/38 Irritating to eyes and skin. R52/53 Harmful to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.

S-phrase(s): S26 In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice. S28 After contact with skin, wash immediately with plenty of soap and water. S61 Avoid release to the environment. Refer to special instructions/ Safety data sheets.

See MSDS for Sulphamic acid for full details in the documents section above.

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Where to Buy Sulphamic Acid / Sulfamic Acid online UK

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Using Sodium Bentonite To Seal Your Ponds

What Is Sodium Bentonite And How Does It Work?

Sodium bentonite products are used to seal large ponds, such as man-made fish ponds. The sodium bentonite clay properties are what make the material work so well as a sealant. Sodium bentonite swells to as much as eighteen times its normal size when wet. As it swells, it fills in the holes of a porous material, thus creating a watertight seal.

Sodium bentonite is so effective for this purpose that it has a wide range of uses. Not only do you find people sealing ponds with sodium bentonite clay, but you will also see bentonite clay use for construction waterproofing. Landfills, sewer drains, and similar installations are sealed using bentonite products.

How Does Bentonite Work?

Sodium bentonite is used as a sealant when ponds are leaking. The application can be done through “blanketing” the soil beneath the pond with the product. This has to be done before the pond is filled. The sodium bentonite prevents water loss as the pond ages (and a normal liner can be placed above it.) When applied to a sufficient depth, however, the bentonite itself acts as a sufficiently strong seal to stop leakage through to the soil.

If you have an existing pond that is leaking, you can use the blanket method, provided you drain the pond first. If you cannot drain the pond, the sprinkle method is your best option. Simply sprinkle granular bentonite on the water’s surface. The particles will sink to the bottom where they will saturate the porous places.

Pros and Cons of Sodium Bentonite Clay

Sodium bentonite clay has a number of attract properties as a sealant:

  • Its ability to swell and block moisture allows it to seep into the soil at the base of a pond in construction or to patch a pond that is leaking.
  • When applied at a thickness of up to 4″, sodium bentonite produces a seal that will withstand use by animals.
  • Sodium bentonite is much more affordable than sealing options. (It does, however, have to be applied by a professional.)

One downside to using sodium bentonite clay is that for proper installation, the pond must be drained. If you have fish, this is easier said than done. While you can use the sprinkle method and not drain the pond, this type of application is not fool proof. There is a chance that the clay particles will not reach all of the places in the soil that may be allowing leaks through.

If you want a good pond seal with sodium bentonite, you will need to have a professional apply the materials for the best results. This method is, however, the best way of sealing ponds, when you can afford to do it. Sealing ponds with sodium bentonite clay will create a watertight seal that stands up to years of use.

Where to Buy Sodium Bentonite online UK

How to Rejuvenate an Old SLA Battery With EDTA

A lead acid battery is, most commonly, a 12 volt battery with a series of six cells. Each cell contains a positive lead oxide plate and a negative lead plate and is filled with a solution of sulphuric acid. As the battery is used, the positive plate reacts with the sulphuric acid and produces lead ions in the water. The lead ions combine with the sulphate ions in the sulphuric acid to form lead sulphate. As the lead sulphate coats the plates, the battery is less effective and will eventually fail. Treating the battery with an acid called EDTA will remove the sulphating and prevent future sulphating.

Things You will Need:

  • Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)
  • Teaspoon

Instructions

  1. For an average sized battery, dissolve 30g (6 teaspoons) EDTA in deionised water. (5g for each cell)
  2. Add this solution equally to each cell.
  3. Agitate the battery frequently for the next couple of days and use the vehicle regularly. Do not charge the battery completely during this time.
  4. Charge the battery thoroughly after a couple of days. You should see increased performance from this point on, as the EDTA frees the plates of lead sulphate that has been coating the plates.

Tips

  • Do not try to dissolve the EDTA directly in the battery acid
  • Remove a small amount of acid before you add the solution
  • This is not a permanent fix, but it will extend the life of your battery

Where to Buy EDTA online UK

 

Created by Mistral Pure Chemicals. View website

How To Make And Use Two Part Wood Bleach

Two-part bleach is easy to use, and usually works very quickly. It can be quite hard to find a shop that sells this bleach, so I have written this article to tell you how make and use it yourself.  The two components of the bleach are labelled “A” and “B” and they are applied separately. Follow the instructions carefully.

What You Will Need:

What Are In The Two Parts?

Part A  Hydrogen Peroxide 3%

Part B “ A Solution containing Sodium Hydroxide, Sodium Metasilicate and Borax

Before You Begin

Before you begin to bleach the wood you need to make up two solutions. The first solution is the bleach Part B, and the second is a borax solution which is used to neutralise, and stop, the bleaching process. Below are the instructions on how to make both of these.

How To Make Part B

To make 1 litre of Part B, in 1 litre of water dissolve:

  • 50g Sodium Hydroxide (Caustic Soda)
  • 50g Sodium Metasilicate
  • 50g Borax

How To Make The Neutralising Borax Solution

Disolve 230g of borax in 1 litre of hot water.

Instructions

Try to apply the two solutions in equal amounts.

  1. Clean the wood, taking off any paint, varnish or dirt
  2. Apply Part A with a paint brush and leave it for roughly 10 minutes.
  3. While Part A is still wet, apply Part B with a paint brush and leave it for 1-2 hours.
  4. Wipe the bleached wood clean with a damp cloth, and then neutralize it with the borax solution . Rinse the wood with clean water, and dry it thoroughly.

One treatment usually bleaches the wood completely, but if the wood isn’t light enough, treat it again.

Post-Bleach Treatment

Treatment with any bleach raises the grain of the wood, even when the piece of furniture has already been thoroughly sanded. To prevent the raised grain from affecting the finish, it must be sanded to the level of the wood surface after the wood is dry.

After bleaching, let the piece of furniture dry for at least two days. Then sand the grain down lightly with grade 5/0 or 6/0 sandpaper; be careful not to roughen the surface. Because there may still be some chemical residue in the wood, wear a breathing mask and use a vacuum to remove sanding dust. Wipe the wood clean with a tack cloth.

One other complication of bleaching is that the wood may be left with a whitish or greyish colour. This is not serious; it indicates that the bleach has dried out the fibres of the wood surface. On hard woods, it disappears when the finish is applied. On soft woods, the gray colour may be pronounced and the loose fibres obvious. To remove them, rub the wood firmly along the grain with No. 000 steel wool; rub the entire bleached area, and make sure the colour is even. The greyish cast will disappear completely when the finish is applied.

Tips

  • It is a good idea to apply the bleach to a small area first to see the results.
  • Use protective equipment (goggles and rubber gloves) when creating part b and also when applying the solution as there are very strong chemicals contained in it.
  • Store Part A (Hydrogen Peroxide) in a cool shady area as sunlight will break it down faster into water and oxygen.
  • Use a seperate paint brush for Part A and Part B, as you want them to react on the wood, not on the brush.

Buy Sodium Hydroxide

Buy Borax

Buy Sodium Metasilicate